British and American armed forces End Wars

The_Battle_of_the_Somme-ww1-british-troops-300-thousand-killed-or-wounded-duing-battle-against-german-machine-guns-barb-wire

The Battle of the Somme, WW1. British troops run to the German machine-guns to die. 300,000 killed or wounded duing the battle in Northern France or Flanders. Against heavy German machine-gun resistance and the myraid of barb-wire fences seen here.

Remembrance Day (sometimes known as Poppy Day) is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth of Nations member states since the end of the First World War to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty. Following a tradition inaugurated by King George V in 1919, the day is also marked by war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries. Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November in most countries to recall the end of hostilities of World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended “at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month”, in accordance with the armistice signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. (“At the 11th hour” refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) The First World War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919.

Over The Top! To death at the hands of the German machine-guns!

Over The Top! To death at the hands of the German machine-guns!

The memorial evolved out of Armistice Day, which continues to be marked on the same date. The initial Armistice Day was observed at Buckingham Palace, commencing with King George V hosting a “Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic” during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace the following morning.

The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem “In Flanders Fields”. These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I.

Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen:

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling

Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.—
Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.
If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—

My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.
F.in’ beautiful anti-war poem by:
Wilfred OwenPoet: Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC.
He was an English poet and soldier, one of the leading poets of the First World War.
Born: March 18, 1893, Oswestry
Died: November 4, 1918, Sambre–Oise Canal, France
Period: World War I
Poems: Dulce et Decorum Est, Disabled, Mental Cases, Insensibility, The Parable of the Old Men and the Young, Elegy in April and September, To Eros
Influenced by: Siegfried Sassoon, John Keats, William Wordsworth.
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One comment

  1. Rebel Juke Admin · November 6, 2015

    ‘Lest we (EVER!) Forget!’
    What these brave men and true soldiers of The British Empire and Commonwealth and the English-speaking Americans did for all of us peoples today! In this, our western European and north American super-rich, affulent and totally FREE Liberal democracies!

    Like

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